Education

Alaska Marine Science Camps, Ocean Science Days and Outreach

Beginning in 2005, Michelle Ridgway began collaborating with the Alaska Marine Conservation Council, coastal Alaskan school districts and Alaska Native entities to develop customized "place based", hands-on Marine Science adventure camps. Camps have been held in Old Harbor ("Nuniaq Camp" Kodiak Island, Gulf of Alaska) in 2006, Juneau ("Auk Noow Camp") in 2007, and the Pribilof Islands ("Pribilof Marine Science Camp", St. George Island) in 2008. After tailoring a curriculum for the oceanic locale, the local culture and research/vessel resources available, Ridgway directs these camps as action-packed, research based scientific expeditions for students. Future camps are planned, and other agencies such as NOAA are now emulating these marine science camp designs to bridge government scientists with student groups.

See False Pass Marine Science Camp ROV Seafloor Habitat by student Alex:

See False Pass Marine Science Camp ROV Survey by student Alex:

PRIBILOF MARINE SCIENCE CAMP 2008

Photo

Aleut student examining giant amphipod collected from shorecast kelp windrows on St. George Island. 25 local students from St. Paul and St. George Island participated in the 2008 camp. Highlights included discovering red king crab juveniles in nearshore seaweed habitat, dissecting flatfish for foodweb and anatomy studies, discovering the second population of the rarest kelp on the planet the "Golden V Kelp" building working "SeaPerch" ROVs, visiting onboard the USCG Ship Healy, and exploring the diversity of Bering Sea zooplankton.

See articles:

Bering Sea Marine Science Education in the Pribilof Islands

"Camp uses marine technology to explore Bering Sea backyard"

Back to top

SCIENCE-COMMUNITY OUTREACH

Photo

Following exploration of undersea canyon habitats in the Bering Sea, we arranged for shipboard visits at port with the ADFG Fisheries Observer team and local students in Dutch Harbor. These bright eyed young men toured the ship and curiously examined the Deep Worker submarines on deck.

See page 6 of the Dutch Harbor FishermanDutch Harbor Fisherman: Photo on pagehttp://www.alaskanewspapers.com/content/pdf/DH_09-13-07.pdf

Michelle Ridgway has shared information from the Greenpeace 2007 Bering Sea Canyons Expedition and other Bering Sea research to over 3,000 people in live audiences, plus radio and Alaska Public Television through presentations, lectures, and interviews. Scientific lectures include: Alaska Marine Science Symposium 2008 Keynote Speaker, American Fisheries Society Alaskan Annual Meeting Reception Speaker, 2007, New England Aquarium Autumn Lecture Series 2008, University of Alaska Southeast "Evening at Egan" Lecture Series 2008, Barrow Arctic Science Consortium 2009, etc, plus dozens of presentations at Alaskan schools, universities and public events.

Ridgway is a member of the ARCUS Northern Science Speakers Bureau

Back to top

AUK'W NOOW MARINE SCIENCE CAMP 2007

Photo

Nearly 40 Juneau area school students were led by a team of Juneau School District Teachers, a NOAA biologist, and Sea Grant Marine Advisory Program agents working with Michelle Ridgway in the first ever Aukw Noow Marine Science Camp in 2007. The unique camp curriculum designed by Ridgway used local beach habitats, access to harbors for oceanographic studies, plus local charter and research platform vessels to allow students their first experience as scientists at sea. This curriculum design was emulated in 2008 by the Juneau-Douglas School District for "Taku Camp" in 2008 and NOAA-STEM-JEDC have announced plans for a similar "Sea Camp" in 2009.

Back to top

 

NUNIAQ MARINE SCIENCE CAMP 2006

Photo

Young deep sea scientist at Old Harbor, Alaska's "Nuniaq Marine Science Camp" exploring Kodiak king crab habitat by Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV). We insist on allowing students to use cutting edge technology to expand their scientific horizons beyond tidepools and beaches into the world ocean.

Back to top

BERING SEA DAYS "OCEAN SCIENCE PROGRAM"

Photo

In April of 2008 and 2009, we were invited to participate in St. Paul Island's Bering Sea Days events. Michelle Ridgway and Leah Okin worked within the school district on both St. Paul and St. George Islands to lead 4 days of intensive ocean studies. Deep sea research, king crab ecology and plankton biodiversity have been themes both years. Students bundle up and endure chilling temperatures, sea ice covering sampling areas and other wintry conditions to take temperature, salinity measurements, collect zooplankton specimens, and examine seafloor habitats by ROV. The St. Paul Tribal Government and Pribilof School District work in partnership with communities and funding organizations to sponsor Bering Sea Days science and cultural events annually.

Back to top